language and social skills

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Language and Social Skills

  • say 8-10 words you can understand
  • look at a person who is talking to him
  • ask specifically for her mother or father
  • use “hi,” “bye,” and “please,” with reminders
  • protest when frustrated
  • ask for something by pointing or by using one word
  • direct another’s attention to an object or action
  • become anxious when separated from parent(s)
  • seek attention
  • bring toys to share with parentact out a familiar activity in play (as in pretending to take a bath)
  • play alone on the floor with toys
  • compete with other children for toys
  • recognize herself in the mirror or in pictures
  • seem selfish at times
Language and Social Skills

  • have a vocabulary of several hundred words
  • use 2-3 word sentences
  • say names of toys
  • ask for information about an object (asks, “Shoe?” while pointing to shoe box)
  • hum or try to sing
  • listen to short rhymes
  • like to imitate parents
  • sometimes get angry and have temper tantrums
  • act shy around strangers
  • comfort a distressed friend or parent
  • take turns in play with other children
  • treat a doll or stuffed animal as though it were alive
  • apply pretend action to others (as in pretending to feed a doll)
  • show awareness of parental approval or disapproval for her actions
  • refer to self by name and use “me” and “mine”
  • verbalize his desires and feelings (“I want cookie”)
  • laugh at silly labeling of objects and events (as in calling a nose an ear)
  • enjoy looking at one book over and over
  • point to eyes, ears, or nose when you ask
Language and Social Skills

  • use 3-5 word sentences
  • ask short questions
  • use plurals (“dogs,” “cars,” “hats”)
  • name at least 10 familiar objects
  • repeat simple rhymes
  • name at least one color correctly
  • imitate housework or help with simple tasks
  • ask to use the toilet almost every time
  • enjoy being read to
  • talk about feelings and mental states (e.g., remembering)
  • demonstrate some shame when caught in a wrongdoing
  • try to make others laugh
  • play spontaneously with two or three children in a group
  • assign roles in pretend social play (“You be mommy;” “I be daddy”)
  • know her first and last name
  • understand “I,” “you,” “he,” and “she”
  • believe everything centers around him (“if I hide my eyes, no one will see me”)
  • answer whether she is a boy or girl
Language and Social Skills

  • have a large vocabulary and use good grammar often
  • often talk about action in conversation (“go,” “do,” “make”)
  • enjoy rhyming and nonsense words
  • use regular past tenses of verbs (“pulled,” “walked”)
  • use “a,” “an,” and “the” when speaking
  • ask direct questions (“May I?” “Would you?”)
  • want explanations of “why” and “how”
  • relate a simple experience she has had recently
  • understand “next to”
  • separate from his parent for a short time without crying
  • help clean up toys at home or school when asked to
  • like to play “dress up”
  • pretend to play with imaginary objects
  • act out elaborate events which tell a story (as in serving an imaginary dinner or going on a “dragon hunt”)
  • sometimes cooperate with other children
  • often prefer playing with other children to playing alone, unless deeply involved in a solitary task
  • change the rules of a game as he goes along
  • try to bargain (“I’ll give you this toy if you’ll give me that one”)
  • share when asked
  • enjoy tag, hide-and-seek and other games with simple rules
  • like moderate “rough and tumble” play
  • like to do things for himself
  • know her age and the town where she lives
  • act as though a doll or stuffed animal thinks and feels on its own

Reprinted with permission from the National Network for Child Care – NNCC. Powell, J. and Smith, C.A. (1994). The 2nd year. In *Developmental milestones: A guide for parents*. Manhattan, KS: Kansas State University Cooperative Extension Service.

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